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Historical Attractions

Morgan Station

Morgan Station

Harper Ridge Road /Located 2 miles E. of Mt. Sterling

This ancient sandstone Pennsylvania Dutch style house was named after Ralph Morgan, second cousin to Daniel Boone. Settled in 1789, this house was erected in 1795 by Anthony Swearingen. Attacked by Indians Aprill, 1793,19 women and children were captured while men worked in the fields. One woman hid in the spring house and gave the alarm, 12 of the prisoners were massacred. Morgan Station occupies the site of the last organized Indian raid in Kentucky.

Gaitskill Indian Mound

Gaitskill

Northern bypas, KY 686

Rising stong and proud, the Gaitskill mound is a legacy to the Adena people who inhabited this region between 800 BC and 700 AD. They began cultivating simple crops, bringing about a mixed hunting and farming economy. Central to Adena life were rituals involving cremation and mound building. Engraved stone tablets found here indicate the mound to be Adena. The Indian burial mound is one of the best preserved in the region. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, 1975.

The Bell House

Bellhouse

51 North Maysville

The Bell House, which was built by William Bell around 1815, was purchased by the county in the 1820's to be used as the county jail and jailer's quarters.

General John Bell Hood Home

 

4 miles west of Mt. Sterling on US 60

Home of the Hood family, 1835-1857. From here John Bell Hood (1831-1879) went to West Point in 1849. Resigned commission in 1861 and then joined the Confererate Army, and served with the Texas Brigade throughout the war. Hood was wounded at Gettysburg; and lost his leg at Chickamauga.

Ascension Episcopal Church

Ascension Episcopal Church

48 West High Street

Built around 1878. The wood for the interior was donated by members of the church. The imported stain glass windows were the first memorial stained glass windows in Mt. Sterling. The doors to the church are open 24 hours a day.

Machpelah Cemetery

Gaitskill

600 East Locust

Machpelah Cemetery is a legacy and tribute "carved in stone" to our rich heritage. This beautiful cemetery is named after the burial site of Abraham's wife, Sarah, as described in the 23rd chapter of Genesis. Here, visitors will find many unique hand carved monuments that give insight into the history of our proud community.

Montgomery County Courthouse

Court House

At the formation of the county, Mount Sterling became the county seat and the first courthouse was built. Mount Sterling has had six courthouses, all located at, or near, the present site, and possibly a seventh, an early log structure.

During the Civil War, the Montgomery County Courthouse was often used as headquarters for the Union Army. The courthouse which changed hands at least twelve times during the Civil War, was burned in 1863 by confederate forces. The present county courthouse, built in 1959, is the 6th one to stand on this site.

During the Civil War, on the night of June 8,1864, Confederate General John Hunt Morgan once again captured the town. As he headed on to Lexington, some of his troops lingered behind.

That very night over $65,000 was taken from the vault of the Farmers Bank on Main Street. The next day, confederate forces were defeated, but the robbers were never identified and the money was never recovered.

Keas Tabernacle CME

Gaitskill

Built in 1787 and named after its first pastor, Rev. Samuel Keas. KEAS continues to provide a ministry to a loyal membership and remains one of the leading and oldest black congregations in Kentucky

Farmer's Bank Building

Farmers Bank

12 South Bank Street

The Farmer's Bank Building is still in its original location and though it is now a specialty store, the owner has preserved the bank vault and other meorabilia.

During the Civil War, on the night of June 8,1864, Confederate General John Hunt Morgan once again captured the town. As he headed on to Lexington, some of his troops lingered behind.

That very night over $65,000 was taken from the vault of the Farmer's Bank on Main Street. The next day. Confederate forces were defeated, but the robbers were never identified and the money was never recovered

That's the unsolved mystery of: The Farmer's Bank Building